The Economy as Our Children Don't Learn It

I want to develop economic culture and knowledge of the professional world within the education system. And yet, according to three recent publications, there is urgency. If the radical approach of Jacques Bourdon in L'École et universities, how to get out of the failure can lend itself to criticism, the report of the Academy of Moral and Political Sciences, published in June 2008, on the teaching of economics in high schools, which shines by the quality and legitimacy of its authors, gives us an equally alarming observation. But how to act when it comes to an animal deemed to be unreportable? Convergences emerge. 

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In Jeanes et enterprises: making a success of the connection, Thibaut Landed is trying an approach that not only encourages the school to better deal with the economy, but also the company to take a better interest in school. Thibaut Landed, company director and president of the Positive enterprise association, reminds us that the economy "is one of the poor relations of education. Economic training during his studies ", not to mention that the economy taught is often very far from that experienced daily in companies. How can we be surprised when only 6% of French people admit to understanding economic mechanisms satisfactorily, while 75% of them believe that economy is more important than politics? 

These figures are cited by the Codices (Council for the dissemination of economic culture), created in 2006 by the Ministry of the Economy, which reminds us that "one of the fundamental missions of the school is to provide students with the means to understand the world around them.” We are far from it. Jacques Bourdon, on the whole, judges that our education system is bankrupt and guilty of youth unemployment. He speaks of the "national scandal which results from the divorce which has established itself between school and the world of work". He insisted on the need to develop vocational education in the manner of Germany and proposed to deepen the reform initiated by the Persse law. For him, the advice of come to a similar conclusion - which they themselves qualify as "worrying". This fascinating report is all the more valuable as its authors called on renowned foreign professors, from Oxford, Columbia, Princeton, Bonn or Barcelona, to take an outside look at our economics textbooks. The judgment is final: a complete reform is essential and urgent. The SES program has overly ambitious goals. The professors are supposed to cover in two years too wide a range of topics while casting on them the intersecting views of economics tuition, sociology and all the social sciences. 

This results in rough processing failing to convey the basics correctly to students. Thus, the study of supply and demand is relegated to a subsection of the chapter on exchange. As for concepts such as marginal cost or even that of risk, however at the basis of modern finance, they are not even dealt with! Whole sections of the microeconomic approach seem to have disappeared. In addition, the treatment of the themes selected often gives the French economy and society a pessimistic view. The authors are unanimous, the tone of the manuals is "compassionate", even "negative", and ideological presuppositions are not absent. Thus, we explain to the students that we must set limits to the market even before having given them a definition. Too often we present an opinion and its opposite rather than the consensual knowledge reached by the modern economy. In conclusion, the authors recommend a teaching of economics distinct from that of social sciences. Education with perhaps more modest objectives but giving the economy its dimension of empirical science and microeconomics the place it deserves. 

Mutual Miscomprehension the Reform of Economic Education in The Est Sector Is Essential

But shouldn't we also extend this education to all high school students in the general sector? According to a recent survey cited by Thibaut Landed, 82% of French people believe that the basics of economics should be part of compulsory subjects. For him, this is one of the key elements in reconnecting young people and businesses. Young people often feel excluded by companies which in return deplore their lack of knowledge of the professional world. The incomprehension is mutual and to overcome it, the school must be more open to the economy. But, if we want the transition from school to the world of work to no longer be an ordeal, the company must also be more open to students and teachers. For example, the 100,000 entrepreneur’s association which offers meetings between entrepreneurs and college students, especially in so-called "sensitive" neighborhoods. And it works: half of the participants declare at the end of the meetings that they want to become entrepreneurs. Our children live in a globalized economy. We owe it to ourselves to give them the keys to understand it. This incomprehension is mutual, and in order to overcome it, the school must be more open to the economy. But, if we want the transition from school to the world of work to no longer be an ordeal, the company must also be more open to students and teachers. For example, the 100,000 entrepreneur’s association which offers meetings between entrepreneurs and college students, especially in so-called "sensitive" neighborhoods. 

And it works: Half of the participants declare at the end of the meetings that they want to become entrepreneurs. Our children live in a globalized economy. We owe it to ourselves to give them the keys to understand it. This incomprehension is mutual, and in order to overcome it, the school must be more open to the economy. But, if we want the transition from school to the world of work to no longer be an ordeal, the company must also be more open to students and teachers. For example, the 100,000 entrepreneur’s association which offers meetings between entrepreneurs and college students, especially in so-called "sensitive" neighborhoods. And it works: half of the participants declare at the end of the meetings that they want to become entrepreneurs. 

Our children live in a globalized economy

We owe it to ourselves to give them the keys to understand it. School for the world of work is no longer an ordeal, the company must also be more open to students and teachers. For example, the 100,000 entrepreneur’s association which offers meetings between entrepreneurs and college students, especially in so-called "sensitive" neighborhoods. And it works: half of the participants declare at the end of the meetings that they want to become entrepreneurs. Our children live in a globalized economy. We owe it to ourselves to give them the keys to understand it. School for the world of work is no longer an ordeal, the company must also be more open to students and teachers. For example, the 100,000 entrepreneur’s association which offers meetings between entrepreneurs and college students, especially in so-called "sensitive" neighborhoods. And it works: half of the participants declare at the end of the meetings that they want to become entrepreneurs. Our children live in a globalized economy. We owe it to ourselves to give them the keys to understand it.